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1,4-Diisocyanatobutane | Cas 4538-37-8

Product specifications

Cas: 4538-37-8
Synonyms: 1,4-Butane diisocyanate | 1,4-butanediisocyanate | 1,4-disocyanatobutane | butane-1,4-diisocyanate | Tetramethylene diisocyanate
MDL: -
Purity99,70%
Molecular formulaC6H8N2O2
Molecular weight140.140 Da
Monoisotopic mass140.058578 Da
Boiling point102-104 C (14mmHg(lit.))
Density1.105 g/ml at 25 C (lit.)
14-diisocyanatobutane chemical structure 2D

Price & Availability

SKUStock Quantity (gr) Price
actu252-10G In stock 10 100
actu252-100G In stock 100
actu252-250G In stock 250
actu252-1KG In stock 1000
actu252-5KG In stock 5000
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Product description

1,4-Diisocyanatobutane ( Cas 4538-37-8) was used in over 8 studies because of its proved non-toxic effects on human health. These studies comprehend early research studies about biodegradability/ biocompatibility, In-Vivo studies, and several field studies. Importantly is to take into account the quality of the product as prelimanary starting materials or catalysts could have an influence on the outcome of a research project. As a result we offer a purity of 99,7% 1,4-diisocyanatobutane.

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Scientific articles

2008 – In vivo resorption of a biodegradable polyurethane foam, based on 1,4-butanediisocyanate: A three-year subcutaneous implantation study

Minnen, B. V., Leeuwen, M. V., Kors, G., Zuidema, J., Kooten, T. V., & Bos, R. (2008). In vivo resorption of a biodegradable polyurethane foam, based on 1,4-butanediisocyanate: A three-year subcutaneous implantation study. Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A, 85A(4), 972-982. doi:10.1002/jbm.a.31574

Degradable polyurethanes (PUs), based on aliphatic diisocyanates, can be very useful in tissue regeneration applications. Their long-term in vivodegradation has not been extensively investigated. In this study a biodegradable PU with copolyester soft segments of DL-lactide/?-caprolactone and hard segments synthesized from 1,4-butanediisocyanate was evaluated with regard to tissue response during degradation and, ultimately, the resorption of the material. Highly porous PU foam discs were subcutaneously implanted in rats and rabbits for intervals up to 3 years. A copolymer foam of DL-lactide and ?-caprolactone served as a control. The foams, the surrounding tissues and the draining lymph nodes were evaluated with light and electron microscopy. In the first stages of degradation the number of macrophages and giant cells increased. As the resorption stage set in their numbers gradually decreased. Electron microscopy showed macrophages containing pieces of PU. The size of the intracellular PU particles diminished and cells containing these remnants gradually disappeared after periods from 1 to 3 years. After 3 years an occasional, isolated macrophage with biomaterial remnants could be traced in both PU and copolymer explants. Single macrophages with biomaterial remnants were observed in the lymph nodes between 39 weeks and 1.5 years following implantation. It is concluded that the PU foam is biocompatible during degradation. After 3 years PU samples had been resorbed almost completely. These results indicate that the PU foam can be safely used as a biodegradable implant.

2005 – Preparation and characterization of highly porous, biodegradable polyurethane scaffolds for soft tissue applications

Guan, J., Fujimoto, K. L., Sacks, M. S., & Wagner, W. R. (2005). Preparation and characterization of highly porous, biodegradable polyurethane scaffolds for soft tissue applications. Biomaterials, 26(18), 3961-3971. doi:10.1016/j.biomaterials.2004.10.018

In the engineering of soft tissues, scaffolds with high elastance and strength coupled with controllable biodegradable properties
are necessary. To fulfill such design criteria we have previously synthesized two kinds of biodegradable polyurethaneureas, namely
poly(ester urethane)urea (PEUU) and poly(ether ester urethane)urea (PEEUU) from polycaprolactone, polycaprolactone-bpolyethylene
glycol-b-polycaprolactone, 1,4-diisocyanatobutane and putrescine. PEUU and PEEUU were further fabricated into
scaffolds by thermally induced phase separation using dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as a solvent. The effect of polymer solution
concentration, quenching temperature and polymer type on pore morphology and porosity was investigated. Scaffolds were
obtained with open and interconnected pores having sizes ranging from several mm to more than 150 mm and porosities of 80–97%.
By changing the polymer solution concentration or quenching temperature, scaffolds with random or oriented tubular pores could
be obtained. The PEUU scaffolds were flexible with breaking strains of 214% and higher, and tensile strengths of approximately
1.0 MPa, whereas the PEEUU scaffolds generally had lower strengths and breaking strains. Scaffold degradation in aqueous buffer
was related to the porosity and polymer hydrophilicity. Smooth muscle cells were filtration seeded in the scaffolds and it was shown
that both scaffolds supported cell adhesion and growth, with smooth muscle cells growing more extensively in the PEEUU scaffold.
These biodegradable and flexible scaffolds demonstrate potential for future application as cell scaffolds in cardiovascular tissue
engineering or other soft tissue applications.

2005 – Synthesis of biocompatible segmented polyurethanes from aliphatic diisocyanates and diurea diol chain extenders

Guelcher, S. A., Gallagher, K. M., Didier, J. E., Klinedinst, D. B., Doctor, J. S., Goldstein, A. S., . . . Hollinger, J. O. (2005). Synthesis of biocompatible segmented polyurethanes from aliphatic diisocyanates and diurea diol chain extenders. Acta Biomaterialia, 1(4), 471-484. doi:10.1016/j.actbio.2005.02.007

Many polyurethane elastomers display excellent mechanical properties and adequate biocompatibility. However, many medical-grade polyurethanes are prepared from aromatic diisocyanates and can degrade in vivo to carcinogenic aromatic diamines, although the question of whether the concentrations of these harmful degradation products attain physiologically relevant levels is currently unresolved and strongly debated. It is therefore desirable to synthesize new medical-grade polyurethanes from less toxic aliphatic diisocyanates. In this paper, biocompatible segmented polyurethane elastomers were synthesized from aliphatic diisocyanates (1,4-diisocyanatobutane (BDI) and lysine methyl ester diisocyanate (LDI)), novel diurea diol chain extenders based on tyrosine and tyramine, and a model poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) diol soft segment. The objectives were to design a hard segment similar in structure to that of MDI-based polyurethanes and also investigate the effects of systematic changes in structure on mechanical and biological properties. The non-branched, symmetric polyurethane prepared from BDI and a tyramine-based chain extender had the highest modulus at 37 °C. Introduction of symmetric short-chain branches (SCBs) incorporated in the tyrosine-based chain extender lowered the modulus by an order of magnitude. Polyurethanes prepared from LDI were soft polymers that had a still lower modulus due to the asymmetric SCBs that hindered hard segment packing. Polyurethanes prepared from tyramine and tyrosine chain extenders thermally degraded at temperatures ranging from 110 to 150 °C, which are lower than that reported previously for phenyl urethanes. All four polyurethanes supported the attachment, proliferation, and high viability of MG-63 human osteoblast-like cells in vitro. Therefore, the non-cytotoxic chemistry of these polyurethanes make them good candidates for further development as biomedical implants.

2004 – Biodegradable poly(ether ester urethane)urea elastomers based on poly(ether ester) triblock copolymers and putrescine: synthesis, characterization and cytocompatibility

Guan, J., Sacks, M. S., Beckman, E. J., & Wagner, W. R. (2004). Biodegradable poly(ether ester urethane)urea elastomers based on poly(ether ester) triblock copolymers and putrescine: Synthesis, characterization and cytocompatibility. Biomaterials, 25(1), 85-96. doi:10.1016/s0142-9612(03)00476-9

Polymers with elastomeric mechanical properties, tunable biodegradation properties and cytocompatibility would be desirable for numerous biomedical applications. Toward this end a series of biodegradable poly(ether ester urethane)urea elastomers (PEEUUs) based on poly(ether ester) triblock copolymers were synthesized and characterized. Poly(ether ester) triblock copolymers were synthesized by ring-opening polymerization of ?-caprolactone with polyethylene glycol (PEG). PEEUUs were synthesized from these triblock copolymers and butyl diisocyanate, with putrescine as a chain extender. PEEUUs exhibited low glass transition temperatures and possessed tensile strengths ranging from 8 to 20 MPa and breaking strains from 325% to 560%. Increasing PEG length or decreasing poly(caprolactone) length in the triblock segment increased PEEUU water absorption and biodegradation rate. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells cultured in a medium supplemented with PEEUU biodegradation solution suggested a lack of degradation product cytotoxicity. Endothelial cell adhesion to PEEUUs was less than 60% of tissue culture polystyrene and was inversely related to PEEUU hydrophilicity. Surface modification of PEEUUs with ammonia gas radio-frequency glow discharge and subsequent immobilization of the cell adhesion peptide Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser increased endothelial adhesion to a level equivalent to tissue culture polystyrene. These biodegradable PEEUUs thus possessed properties that would be amenable to applications where high strength and flexibility would be desirable and exhibited the potential for tuning with appropriate triblock segment selection and surface modification.

2005 -BIODEGRADABLE BLOCK COPOLYMERS BASED ON TRIMETHYLENE CARBONATE, LACTIDES, AND POLY(ETHYLENE GLYCOL)

Zhang, Z. (2006). Biodegradable block copolymers based on trimethylene carbonate, lactides, and poly(ethylene glycol). doi:ISBN 90-365-2299-4

This thesis describes the preparation of biodegradable block copolymers based on trimethylene carbonate (TMC), lactides, and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), and their potential applications in medicine. In Chapter 2 the current literature on degradable block copolymers is reviewed and a general background with regard to this thesis is given. Biodegradable polymers are widely used in surgery and drug delivery systems; understanding their degradation behavior is of essential importance. Polymer degradation leads to erosion of the material and mass loss, which can occur in the bulk or at the surface of the implanted device. The characteristics of these different erosion processes are discussed in Chapter 2. Also a general survey of biodegradable copolymers applied in the medical and pharmaceutical fields is given, focusing on amphiphilic block copolymers containing poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and on phase-separated multiblock copolymers as thermoplastic elastomers. Among the biodegradable polymers used, aliphatic polyesters are the most often employed. Usually, they are synthesized by ring-opening polymerization of lactones with stannous octoate as a catalyst. The reaction mechanism of the ring-opening polymerization is discussed. The properties of poly(lactide)s and their stereocomplexes have been investigated and are reported in this thesis. Poly(D,L-lactide) (PDLLA) is amorphous, while poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) and poly(D-lactide) (PDLA) are semi-crystalline materials. Enantiomeric PLLA and PDLA form high-melting stereocomplexes. In general poly(lactide)s are rigid and degrade by bulk erosion. Compared to poly(lactide)s, poly(TMC) (PTMC) is much more flexible, which can be advantageous in applications in soft tissues. Moreover, PTMC degrades in vivo by surface erosion without formation of detrimental acidic compounds. This is of special interest for drug delivery systems. The synthesis, properties and biomedical applications of PTMC and TMC-based (co)polymers are reviewed in Chapter 2 as well. Summary 160 In Chapter 3, we report on the degradation behavior of PTMC in vivo and in vitro. In the in vivo degradation studies, PTMC specimens were implanted in the femur and tibia of rabbits. Surface erosion characteristics were demonstrated. The in vitro degradation studies were performed using lipase solutions (lipase from Thermomyces Lanuginosus) and nonenzymatic media with pH values ranging from 1.0 to 13.0. It was found that PTMC degrades in lipase solutions by a surface erosion process, but does not degrade in very acidic or basic environments. Therefore, it is concluded that enzymes play an important role in the degradation of PTMC in vivo. Furthermore, we found that both in vivo and in enzyme solutions, the surface erosion rates of low molecular weight PTMC specimens are significantly lower than those of high molecular weight specimens. This is likely due to the more hydrophilic surface of the lower molecular weight PTMC specimens, which reduces lipase activity. In Chapter 4, the enzymatic surface erosion behavior of PTMC is studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The surface erosion of spin-coated PTMC films (23-48 nm thick) by the same lipase solutions was studied. After immersion in the lipase solutions, the roughness of the films increased and their average thickness decreased in time. The rate of enzymatic surface erosion of the PTMC films was 11.0±3.7 nm/min, which is comparable to that of the much thicker, compression-molded discs reported in Chapter 3. When the contact time of the films with the lipase solutions was limited to less than 5 s, degradation of the surface is minimal and individual lipase molecules adsorbed on the PTMC films could be discerned. Micro-contact printing of a PTMC film surface using a PDMS stamp and the lipase solution allowed patterning of the film surface with predefined microstructures of varying heights and surface properties. Since PTMC is non-toxic and very compatible with different cells and tissues, such micro-patterned surfaces have great potential for use in medical applications where cell patterning is required. For applications in (tissue engineering of) soft tissues, biodegradable materials are often subjected to static and dynamic loading. Therefore, creep-resistant elastomers are desired. Linear PTMC has a limited creep resistance during long-term static or dynamic loading. To improve the creep-resistance of TMC based materials, triblock copolymers based on TMC and lactides were prepared (Chapter 5). Thermoplastic elastomers showing good mechanical properties, especially with regard to elasticity, were obtained when crystallizable Summary 161 poly(lactide) blocks of sufficient lengths were used to form the hard blocks (poly(LLATMC-LLA) and poly(DLA-TMC-DLA)). The mechanical properties and the creep-resistance could be improved even further by stereocomplex formation between enantiomeric poly(lactide) segments of the triblock copolymers in blends (poly(ST-TMC-ST)). The thermal and mechanical properties of the block copolymers can be regulated within a wide range by adjusting their composition. Chapter 6 deals with well-defined, highly porous poly(ST-TMC-ST) structures with interconnected pores which were prepared by a method in which poly(LLA-TMC-LLA) and poly(DLA-TMC-DLA) triblock copolymers are co-precipitated with salt particles, compression molded, and subsequently leached with water. These highly porous poly(STTMC-ST) discs (porosity 87%, pore size 123 µm) have a very good recovery behavior after prolonged compressive deformation. Such poly(ST-TMC-ST) materials and scaffolds are attractive for use in cell culturing and tissue engineering when long-term mechanical deformation of the structures is desired. Preliminary results of the degradation experiments in vitro show that these porous structures are degradable in lipase solutions, as described in Appendix A. Chapter 7 focuses on the preparation of microparticles from PTMC and monomethoxypoly(ethylene glycol)-PTMC (mPEG-PTMC) diblock copolymers by a double emulsion technique. Microparticles of PTMC and mPEG-PTMC with diameters ranging between 1 and 50 µm could be obtained. After freeze-drying and redispersion, the shape and size of the microparticles did not change significantly. Hydrophilic model compounds (BSA, lysozyme and Coomassie® Brilliant Blue G) can be readily loaded into these microparticles at efficiencies higher than 70%. Microparticles loaded with Coomassie® Brilliant Blue G showed a sustained release profile of the blue dye. More than 90% of the loaded Coomassie® Brilliant Blue G was released in 60 d. The degradation behavior of mPEG-PTMC in vitro was studied and the results are presented in Appendix B. The degradation of mPEG-PTMC diblock copolymers in water and in buffer at pH 4 is extremely slow, but extensive enzymatic degradation had occurred in lipase solutions (lipase from Thermomyces Lanuginosus) in 20 wks. In Chapter 8, the applicability of PTMC homopolymers and its block copolymers with mPEG for the delivery of hydrophobic drugs was evaluated. Well-defined nanoparticles Summary 162 based on PTMC could be prepared by single emulsion and salting out methods using PVA as a stabilizer. The size of the nanoparticles can be controlled by adjusting the stirring speeds and the polymer concentrations employed. The formed particles can readily be freeze-dried and redispersed without changes in average size and size distribution. With an amphiphilic mPEG-PTMC diblock copolymer, nanoparticles were prepared without using an additional stabilizer. The size of these mPEG-PTMC nanoparticles always ranged between 95 and 120 nm. These nanoparticles can be freeze-dried and redispersed as well. Dexamethasone was efficiently loaded into PTMC and mPEG-PTMC nanoparticles during their preparation by both the salting out and the single emulsion methods. The release of dexamethasone was sustained and diffusion controlled. Complete release of the drug was achieved in times ranging from 2 wks to 60 d. These results show that PTMC and mPEGPTMC nanoparticles are attractive for the controlled delivery of hydrophobic drugs. Chapter 9 reports on a novel, thermo-sensitive transition from mPEG-PTMC films to micellar-like nanoparticles. Solvent-cast mPEG-PTMC films were stable in water at room temperature, whereas at 37 oC the films dissociated and the block copolymers self-assembled into micellar-like nanoparticles. The dissociation of the films at 37 oC is due to the melting of PTMC segments (in the wet state) at this temperature. The critical aggregation concentration of the dispersed mPEG-PTMC particles is 1.35×10 ?3 mg/ml. This thermo-sensitive transition from film to micellar-like nanoparticles is applicable in the preparation of controlled drug release systems: dexamethasone could be loaded into the mPEG-PTMC nanoparticles at a high loading efficiency of 93.3 wt%. The release of dexamethasone was sustained and complete in 20 d. In Appendix C, stereocomplexation-induced gelation of lactide-containing block copolymers in aqueous media was investigated. Linear and star-shaped PEG-PLA block polymers form thermo-sensitive hydrogels, the star-shaped block copolymers form gels at lower concentrations. Due to stereocomplexation, the sol-gel transitions of enantiomeric mixtures occur at relatively lower concentrations and higher temperatures as compared to that of the single block copolymers. In conclusion biodegradable block copolymers based on trimethylene carbonate, lactides, and poly(ethylene glycol) are exciting materials and very promising for a variety of applications in medicine

2005 – Preparation and characterization of highly porous, biodegradable polyurethane scaffolds for soft tissue applications

Guan, J., Fujimoto, K. L., Sacks, M. S., & Wagner, W. R. (2005). Preparation and characterization of highly porous, biodegradable polyurethane scaffolds for soft tissue applications. Biomaterials, 26(18), 3961-3971. doi:10.1016/j.biomaterials.2004.10.018

In the engineering of soft tissues, scaffolds with high elastance and strength coupled with controllable biodegradable properties are necessary. To fulfill such design criteria we have previously synthesized two kinds of biodegradable polyurethaneureas, namely poly(ester urethane)urea (PEUU) and poly(ether ester urethane)urea (PEEUU) from polycaprolactone, polycaprolactone-b-polyethylene glycol-b-polycaprolactone, 1,4-diisocyanatobutane and putrescine. PEUU and PEEUU were further fabricated into scaffolds by thermally induced phase separation using dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as a solvent. The effect of polymer solution concentration, quenching temperature and polymer type on pore morphology and porosity was investigated. Scaffolds were obtained with open and interconnected pores having sizes ranging from several ?m to more than 150 ?m and porosities of 80–97%. By changing the polymer solution concentration or quenching temperature, scaffolds with random or oriented tubular pores could be obtained. The PEUU scaffolds were flexible with breaking strains of 214% and higher, and tensile strengths of approximately 1.0 MPa, whereas the PEEUU scaffolds generally had lower strengths and breaking strains. Scaffold degradation in aqueous buffer was related to the porosity and polymer hydrophilicity. Smooth muscle cells were filtration seeded in the scaffolds and it was shown that both scaffolds supported cell adhesion and growth, with smooth muscle cells growing more extensively in the PEEUU scaffold. These biodegradable and flexible scaffolds demonstrate potential for future application as cell scaffolds in cardiovascular tissue engineering or other soft tissue applications.

2005 – Understanding the biodegradation of polyurethanes: From classical implants to tissue engineering materials

Santerre, J., Woodhouse, K., Laroche, G., & Labow, R. (2005). Understanding the biodegradation of polyurethanes: From classical implants to tissue engineering materials. Biomaterials, 26(35), 7457-7470. doi:10.1016/j.biomaterials.2005.05.079

After almost half a century of use in the health field, polyurethanes (PUs) remain one of the most popular group of biomaterials applied for medical devices. Their popularity has been sustained as a direct result of their segmented block copolymeric character, which endows them with a wide range of versatility in terms of tailoring their physical properties, blood and tissue compatibility, and more recently their biodegradation character. While they became recognized in the 1970s and 1980s as the blood contacting material of choice in a wide range of cardiovascular devices their application in long-term implants fell under scrutiny with the failure of pacemaker leads and breast implant coatings containing PUs in the late 1980s. During the next decade PUs became extensively researched for their relative sensitivity to biodegradation and the desire to further understand the biological mechanisms for in vivo biodegradation. The advent of molecular biology into mainstream biomedical engineering permitted the probing of molecular pathways leading to the biodegradation of these materials. Knowledge gained throughout the 1990s has not only yielded novel PUs that contribute to the enhancement of biostability for in vivo long-term applications, but has also been translated to form a new class of bioresorbable materials with all the versatility of PUs in terms of physical properties but now with a more integrative nature in terms of biocompatibility. The current review will briefly survey the literature, which initially identified the problem of PU degradation in vivo and the subsequent studies that have led to the field’s further understanding of the biological processes mediating the breakdown. An overview of research emerging on PUs sought for use in combination (drug+polymer) products and tissue regeneration applications will then be presented.

2005 – Uncatalyzed synthesis, thermal and mechanical properties of polyurethanes based on poly(?-caprolactone) and 1,4-butane diisocyanate with uniform hard segment

Guelcher, S. A., Gallagher, K. M., Didier, J. E., Klinedinst, D. B., Doctor, J. S., Goldstein, A. S., . . . Hollinger, J. O. (2005). Synthesis of biocompatible segmented polyurethanes from aliphatic diisocyanates and diurea diol chain extenders. Acta Biomaterialia, 1(4), 471-484. doi:10.1016/j.actbio.2005.02.007

Many polyurethane elastomers display excellent mechanical properties and adequate biocompatibility. However, many medical-grade polyurethanes are prepared from aromatic diisocyanates and can degrade in vivo to carcinogenic aromatic diamines, although the question of whether the concentrations of these harmful degradation products attain physiologically relevant levels is currently unresolved and strongly debated. It is therefore desirable to synthesize new medical-grade polyurethanes from less toxic aliphatic diisocyanates. In this paper, biocompatible segmented polyurethane elastomers were synthesized from aliphatic diisocyanates (1,4-diisocyanatobutane (BDI) and lysine methyl ester diisocyanate (LDI)), novel diurea diol chain extenders based on tyrosine and tyramine, and a model poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) diol soft segment. The objectives were to design a hard segment similar in structure to that of MDI-based polyurethanes and also investigate the effects of systematic changes in structure on mechanical and biological properties. The non-branched, symmetric polyurethane prepared from BDI and a tyramine-based chain extender had the highest modulus at 37 °C. Introduction of symmetric short-chain branches (SCBs) incorporated in the tyrosine-based chain extender lowered the modulus by an order of magnitude. Polyurethanes prepared from LDI were soft polymers that had a still lower modulus due to the asymmetric SCBs that hindered hard segment packing. Polyurethanes prepared from tyramine and tyrosine chain extenders thermally degraded at temperatures ranging from 110 to 150 °C, which are lower than that reported previously for phenyl urethanes. All four polyurethanes supported the attachment, proliferation, and high viability of MG-63 human osteoblast-like cells in vitro. Therefore, the non-cytotoxic chemistry of these polyurethanes make them good candidates for further development as biomedical implants.

2009 – Synthesis and microstructure–mechanical property relationships of segmented polyurethanes based on a PCL–PTHF–PCL block copolymer as soft segment

Rueda-Larraz, L., D’Arlas, B. F., Tercjak, A., Ribes, A., Mondragon, I., & Eceiza, A. (2009). Synthesis and microstructure–mechanical property relationships of segmented polyurethanes based on a PCL–PTHF–PCL block copolymer as soft segment. European Polymer Journal, 45(7), 2096-2109. doi:10.1016/j.eurpolymj.2009.03.013

The goal of this work has been the synthesis of novel materials based on a biodegradable polycaprolactone-block–polytetrahydrofurane-block–polycaprolactone diol (PCL-b–PTHF-b–PCL). The segmented thermoplastic polyurethanes (STPU) have been synthesised in bulk without catalyst at different molar ratios and their characterization has been performed by different techniques. The physic-chemical interactions, responsible for the unique polyurethane properties, have been evaluated by total attenuated Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR) in the amide I region using a Gaussian deconvolution technique and, on the other hand, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been employed to determine the phase microstructures. The effect of increase the hard segment content (HS) has been discussed from the viewpoint of the miscibility of hard and soft segments, analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The influence of HS content on the microstructure–mechanical property relationships has also been investigated. Special attention has been focused on the wettability of the samples, measured through water contact angle measurements (WCA), to determine the tendency for biocompatibility of the samples.

2009 – Synthesis and microstructure–mechanical property relationships of segmented polyurethanes based on a PCL–PTHF–PCL block copolymer as soft segment

Rueda-Larraz, L., D’Arlas, B. F., Tercjak, A., Ribes, A., Mondragon, I., & Eceiza, A. (2009). Synthesis and microstructure–mechanical property relationships of segmented polyurethanes based on a PCL–PTHF–PCL block copolymer as soft segment. European Polymer Journal, 45(7), 2096-2109. doi:10.1016/j.eurpolymj.2009.03.013

The goal of this work has been the synthesis of novel materials based on a biodegradable polycaprolactone-block–polytetrahydrofurane-block–polycaprolactone diol (PCL-b–PTHF-b–PCL). The segmented thermoplastic polyurethanes (STPU) have been synthesised in bulk without catalyst at different molar ratios and their characterization has been performed by different techniques. The physic-chemical interactions, responsible for the unique polyurethane properties, have been evaluated by total attenuated Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR) in the amide I region using a Gaussian deconvolution technique and, on the other hand, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been employed to determine the phase microstructures. The effect of increase the hard segment content (HS) has been discussed from the viewpoint of the miscibility of hard and soft segments, analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The influence of HS content on the microstructure–mechanical property relationships has also been investigated. Special attention has been focused on the wettability of the samples, measured through water contact angle measurements (WCA), to determine the tendency for biocompatibility of the samples.

Certificate of Analysis

Cat#8040403
Product name1,4-diisocyanatobutane
Cas#4538-37-8
Molecular formulaC6H8N2O2
Molecular weight140.14
Batchnr.124513
Quantity4 x 1000 gr.
Inspection parameterStandardResult
appearanceColorless liquidColorless liquid
Purity (GC)>99.7%99.9%
1H-NMRConformConform

Safety documentation

CLP classification

GHS07, GSH08
Acute Toxicity Category 4
Eye Irritation Category 2A
Respiratory Sensitizer Category 1
Skin Corrosion/Irritation Category 2
Skin Sensitizer Category 1
STOT – SE Category 3

Extra

Purity 99,70%

14-diisocyanatobutane chemical structure 2D

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